Jodi's Walk Home

Jodi Miller understands that the path to success is a long, complicated walk.
 
Jodi started her path when she turned away from 13 years of drug abuse. Her addictions to methamphetamines and cocaine caused her to lose her home and her two sons, Kayden and Kyler. “I was sleeping in my car for a long time,” Jodi says. “Then I faced a felony and lost my license and my car. I had hit rock bottom.”
 
“I wanted to get clean and I needed help. I met with Sheryl at Sans Souci and she gave me a job,” says Jodi. Jodi lived with a friend’s mother in the Lincoln Central Neighborhood and walked to Sans Souci for work every day. “I worked there for about six months while I was getting back on my feet. I was making progress, but I needed to get a place to live, get my license, and get my kids back.” Sheryl connected Jodi to Bartholomew County Works, a program of the Lincoln Central Neighborhood Family Center that helps prepare local people with the skills they need to secure a full-time job with benefits. Jodi walked to her Bartholomew County Works class every day, and after completing the program secured a job at Caltherm in Columbus. Still without a license and car, Jodi woke at 2:30 a.m. every morning to walk to her new 4:30 a.m. start time at Caltherm.
 
Things were looking up for Jodi, until her housing situation suddenly shifted and she found herself facing homelessness once again. Determined not to slip back into the cycle of poverty, she turned back to her resources at Bartholomew County Works. “They sent me over to Love Chapel and Human Services, Inc. who helped me get temporary housing at Cherry Street apartments. I was there for three months, and saved all my paychecks from Caltherm. I only spent what I absolutely had to." Jodi's mentors took notice of her focus and discipline. "They were surprised at how much I was saving! They helped me pay my first month’s rent to get my own apartment.”
 
Today, Jodi lives in her apartment with Star and her youngest son, Kayden. She still works at Caltherm, but no longer walks to work; she recently got her license back and was able to save enough money to buy a car. After a year of sobriety, employment, and financial stability, what is Jodi looking forward to next? “Just looking to live life now,” she says. “I'm thankful for the help I've got. Now, my 16 year old will ask me for money and it feels good to be able to give it to him. I go to all of his basketball games. It just feels good. I’m enjoying it.”